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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Oct 7, 2010 2:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Terrapin.

I can guarantee you I have much better ways of spending 12 minutes of my life.

Now if Brent had ever sung Terrapin...

Crap, I think I just killed Rob.

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Poster: olympiaroad Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

I'll admit I sometimes skip Terrapin and LLR. Ok, occasionally a Masterpiece or a Blow Away. Then there are the times I don't skip 'em and I go "oh wow, that must be one of the best versions of this song".

I listen to full tours, take a week or so break, then start another tour. Always in season. (Current tour is fall 82) I allow myself one skip per show though I don't always take it, (almost never by halfway through the tour). When I do take one, I justify it by calling it a "bathroom break" I might have taken anyway.

Of course, when I hit a show I actually attended, I should probably listen to the song I'm inclined to skip...I most likely hit the bathroom during it at the show.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 7, 2010 2:21pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

I still haven't gotten over the fact that I had to debate someone about that tune right here at the Forum; it seems so many of us are like minded about it that it still irks me. That might have ranked up there with your 12' of lost time: it took at least 10' to post and reply to our old "friend" Trumpet the Terrapin Head about my dislike of that song. But, thinking of Brent doing it has raised it to an entirely new level of disdain; imaginary, I know (WTF, all of my best friends are "virtual" now, so imaginary isn't as odd as it used to be, eh?).

Incoherent rant over; just FYI in case you are wondering.

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Oct 7, 2010 2:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

I'll have to look up that thread to read how many ways you hate this song.

For me, Built To Last has nothing of value. ech.

Can't understand skipping Tennessee Jed... on the other hand, I've heard MAMU so many times, it's gotten to be something I can pass. Minglewood is another - a fine tune, just played too damn often, only 435 times... even JG thought that every single note from that tune had been squeezed out.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 7, 2010 4:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Here you go:

http://www.archive.org/post/271768/the-complete-terrapin-station-suite-all-9-tracks-help-needed

Gotta scroll down to find my first entry, and then HFlow, Rob, and SDH all chime in (at my defense, I think? Yeah for the Forum Tag Team, rah, rah. etc., etc.). It was actually an extended debate over the defn of "melodrama" which shortly became a word almost as popular as "methinks" round these parts. Doesn't have the same appeal, of course...

Strangely enough, TS came of age right in the middle of my DEAD touring days, and we all didn't care for it much then...But, being followed by the disco DEAD, maybe we should've counted our blessings?

Don't worry folks, I know I've offended everyone, but no need to write in, I am well aware of it.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

What counts as Disco Dead?

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Poster: RBNW....new and improved! Date: Oct 8, 2010 8:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

1968

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Shakedown Street.

Dancin ... Disco Dancin' in the Street.

Shakedown turned into a great jam, but initially it seemed like the godzilla of disco was eating the Dead alive. Who knew what would happen next? White John Travola suits on album covers, perhaps?!?

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Oct 7, 2010 7:20pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Really? Since I wasn't into it then, I didn't know that. and Estimated Prophet?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 7, 2010 8:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

It really did scare the beejeebers out of us back in 78, but live, they really didn't change much when it came out; we took a GREAT deal of crap from the "outsiders" that we fought with though (ie, the people that said the DEAD weren't any good, etc., really latched onto that effort with the "disco" sound...it comes thru the album moreso than in live versions of the same songs I'll admit). To be honest, I think I gave up trying to defend them about then--got tired of it, grew up, dunno...?

It was just a few short yrs and I was done with them, but as much due to the changing scene as I've so often blabbed on about...truth is, I can't even recall the tunes on that album; or the next--the one with the white suits, right Althea? That one has "Althea" on it, right? Pathetic lack of knowledge, and I know I could google it, but it's against my principles. I did buy the two live albums of 80 or so, but that was it...then, yrs later, I gave away (little sister I'd turned liked them--she saw mostly 80s shows) all the post 73 albums. So, I was heading down the path toward the early era by 82, and this place, in 05, finished me off!

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Poster: duckpond74 Date: Oct 8, 2010 8:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

"It really did scare the beejeebers out of us ..." I remember vividly, seeing 'Go To Heaven' on the store racks for the first time and shouting out loud to no one in particular "Oh no, this can't be ... tell me this isn't for real ...". We debated for quite a while whether one of us could even muster the inner strength to purchase one, just to see if those 'merry pranksters' were just pulling a stunt on us all . . . the four of us had each been buying every dead album upon release from 'Anthem ...' on, and this was a serious challenge. I remember all of us sitting on the same couch listening to it, and feeling our collective souls sink deeper and deeper into the cracks of that old sofa. No one spoke as I turned over the album. The room had an air of a wake for a dear old friend - the perceived loss was that emphatic . . . an end of an era.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 8, 2010 8:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Ah--again, on you and Rosey here have confirmed this experience. Validation!

I think that the folks that came of age around then, and many of the regulars here, if I recall dates correctly, didn't start seeing them til late 70s, early 80s, and thus they didn't witness firsthand the transition from Skull and Roses albums/shows, to the last two albums of the late 70s, that really were a significant change. Sure, we'd had Wake, Mars, Blues, and Terrapin, but the last two, Shake and Heaven, were dramatic departures we all thought.

But again, live, I can see how folks didn't view it that way; if you were just getting into the DEAD, live, I can understand that you wouldn't have had the feelings those of us had that lived thru it...waiting each yr for the next release; you describe it perfectly.

I also had the same experience with Bob's solo efforts: just compare Kingfish with his 78/79 release HHtheFool? Or whatever it is...same bizarre cover with Bob looking clean and mainstream. Where are the skulls? Where's the interesting Mouse/Kelly artwork that made albums worth pondering over for hours?

Yikes!

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Poster: duckpond74 Date: Oct 8, 2010 11:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Always loved the Kelley/Mouse artwork - we always appreciated their artwork with any release - it was more than complimentary to the release, it defined the package/release. . . . always preferred their adaptation of Edmund Sullivan's Skeleton and Roses from his illustrations for 'The Rubyat of Omar Khayyam' and the subsequent 'Skull and Roses' over the 'Steal Your Face', and yet, I can accept the SYF images over those damn dancing bears . . . this is the Grateful Dead people, not Romper Room, Care Bears or Sesame Street! Where do the bears fit in? aaaaarrrrgh!!

When Kingfish came out, I was livin' in the heart of farm country. The locals my age had never heard the Dead, though some had heard of them, and a few folks had NRPS, the Byrds and Commander Cody albums. They loved Kingfish and went on to buy 'Europe 72' (Tennessee Jed, Brown Eyed Women), 'Workingman's Dead', 'Bear's Choice', and 'Skull and Roses' (basically all of each of the first sides of the 2 lps were their 'psychedelic country/cowboy heaven'). I moved away soon after, so I don't know what them rural folk thought of Bob's subsequent efforts, but I couldn't stand them - any of them. The last solo Bob effort that I could listen to and appreciate was his work with Ramblin' Jack Elliot about 10 years ago.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:04pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Yeah, Go to Heaven has those embarrassing white suits, and Althea is on it. The last great song before the muse took a very long vacation. Of course it was written and performed a bit earlier. '79?

Sheesh, that was an awful album. It also has Alabama Getaway, which come to think of it, is a JG-Hunter tune that I do often skip. And Don't Ease Me In, which is probably the only traditional song that doesn't grab me and I'll sometimes skip past.

I think my skip list is separated into Unbearable (the Brent songs, basically) and Just Kinda Boring (Hell in a Bucket, Alabama Getaway, Push Comes to Shove, probably a few others that I sometimes but not always skip). If I listened to more later years (post-85, roughly) I'd probably include a third category for skippable covers.

But, WT, you're wrong about Terrapin :-)



This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2010-10-08 04:04:01

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Be careful! Shhhh....I was shocked to find out how many late 70s and early 80s fans turned out to agree--at least partially--with me on that tune. I fig'd when I let that out I'd be on my own. Maybe they just came to my defense against Trumpet Head for fun? You never know with this crowd. That might have been before your time hereabouts.

But, I won't hold it against you; besides, turtles are my friends (as much as I never got that whole album cover, BTW).

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Yeah, well, the album ... over-produced and schlocky. Someone should have locked the door to keep producers away from the band. Or maybe keep the band away from the studio.

That discussion was before my time. Silly me, I thought the archives was about the music and the reviews. I didn't realize what a great time waster it is!

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 8:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Hmmm. I never thought of Estimated that way, but I could see how someone might. I think it just seemed meant to be jammed, whereas Shakedown Street seemed to be all about stayin' alive in the music scene and shakin' that commercial bootie.

I actually saw my first show the same month Shakedown was released, so I got into the Dead just as folks were recoiling in horror about the possible loss of All That Was Good. Disco was so deeply loathed that I think there was a widespread reflexive fear that the Dead had caved. Which they sort of had, or tried to, in a few songs ... though the essential Deadedness reasserted itself quickly in the actual shows, and IMO Shakedown turned out to be more funky and jammy than Dead Disco Duck.



This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2010-10-08 03:40:32

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 8, 2010 6:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Ya know, it does my heart good to read of this...many times I've posted "disco DEAD" and folks here don't get it, don't agree, etc., etc.

I realized reading your posts that if YOU were there at the time, and if you'd spent yrs defending the DEAD, it WAS the case that the "opposition" had an airtight case against you when this album came out: it sounded disco, it sounded sellout, and it was tougher than ever to defend them.

I realize now that many hear really heard them live more in the 80s and 90s when those "disco tunes" were just one more jam vehicle or what not. But, that was NOT the reception of the original album.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Oct 8, 2010 10:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Yes, this is very interesting, I didn't know any of this, seeing them in the early 80's.

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Poster: duckpond74 Date: Oct 8, 2010 7:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Feel Like A Stranger - even though, like with Tom Tom Club, I can find redeeming, if not entertaining, moments.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Oct 7, 2010 3:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

I'll come back and haunt you for that, you black-hearted personification of evil.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Oct 8, 2010 6:05am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brent Mydland

Great, that's just what I need. A haggis munching poltergeist.

Now, to bring up another Tolkien reference, if ghosts who lust after finger-jewelry were call Ring Wraiths, I suppose that would make you a Sheep Wraith.